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Can I insure an empty house?

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Whether you’re planning an extended holiday, got big renovation plans, or you’re waiting for a house sale to go through, there are many reasons why your home may be left empty. But did you know that an empty house could require specialist insurance?

Here we look at what empty house building insurance is, when you may need it, and how to make sure you’re properly covered.

Why do I need empty house insurance? 

Regular home insurance policies may not cover properties that are left empty for more than a certain length of time or if they do there are often significant restrictions. This is because empty houses are seen as being at higher risk from vandalism, criminal damage, theft, fire or water leaks.

Every insurance provider is different but the specific details of this will be found within your policy documents. Some insurance providers class a house as empty if it’s left unoccupied for 30 consecutive days. Others will give you 60 consecutive days before they class your home as empty.

With that in mind, if your home is going to be empty for a minimum of 30 days, you may need to look into getting a specialist empty house insurance policy.

House insurance for empty properties tends to be a little more expensive than standard home insurance because as we mentioned previously, insurers see empty homes as being high risk.

Can I have empty house insurance for 1 month? 

If your house is only going to be empty for one month, you probably won’t need empty house insurance as you’ll still be covered by your regular home insurance. However, some home insurance providers do class your property as empty after just 30 consecutive days so you’ll need to check your specific policy details or contact your existing provider.

Standard home insurance policies tend to cover you for a year, however, empty insurance policies can be more flexible as your property may not be left empty for the whole 12 months. Policies may be offered for three, six or nine months depending on the provider and your specific circumstances.

What happens to the insurance for an empty house after death? 

Insurance policies for buildings and home contents can become invalid after the death of the policy holder depending on your policy so please check with the current insurer. If someone is still living in the house after the policy holder has passed away, a new policy may need to be taken out with the new policyholder named on the documents.

If the house is going to be left empty after the death of the policy holder, the insurance provider should be notified. During probate an empty property may require specialist empty home insurance.

Do I need added security in an empty house? 

Security systems are invaluable to unoccupied properties and can provide you with peace of mind. Some empty house insurance providers require you to have security measures in place and these will be detailed in your policy documents. If you do not have them in place and your policy states that you need them, your policy may be voided.

Whether or not they are required by your insurance provider, having security in an empty house is something you should seriously consider to deter vandals, squatters and thieves. Alarms are one of the most popular security systems you can consider but things like motion detection lights on the outside of the property can also be a great security feature and can reduce the likelihood of break-ins.

Each insurer is likely to want you to make regular visits to the house or get someone to do it on your behalf. The frequency of these visits will be in your terms and conditions. 

Getting empty home insurance quotes 

If you’re looking to get empty house insurance quotes, we can help. At UKinsuranceNET we have the expertise and experience to help you access a number of empty house insurance quotes to find the empty house insurance you need. Start your search for a quote for empty house insurance by contacting us today.

 

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