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London’s Airbnb hotspots

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An item in Property Investor Today recently not only confirmed the runaway popularity of the capital for Airbnb hosts, but also revealed the current hotspots among London’s boroughs.

The rankings are based on the average number of searches each month made for Airbnb listings on Google UK.

Unsurprisingly, perhaps, given the draw for tourists, Kensington and Chelsea came out on top – although these are also the most expensive boroughs for Airbnb guests. The Royal Borough is an average of £57 a night more expensive than second-placed Camden, for example, and £74 more expensive than third-placed Hammersmith and Fulham.

The latter ranks equally with both Islington and Greenwich, where average overnight stays are cheaper yet.

With its fast and regular train services both to central London and to Gatwick airport, Croydon is also a very popular choice – and offers some of the cheapest Airbnb prices within Greater London (equating with Barking and Dagenham, for example).

Although it’s packed full of some of the capital’s most iconic landmarks for tourists, the high price of property – and, therefore the expense of an Airbnb stay – Westminster is among the least searched (even though the borough offers some of the most extensive listings).

As we reported on the 9th of April, the Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) has expressed its concern about the mushrooming of short-term Airbnb-style lets in the capital – which it estimates to number around 77,000 and includes entire houses among the listed properties.

The CIH has labelled these concentrations of Airbnb lets as “globalhoods” – which risk driving out permanent residents from the capital and lead to the loss of much-needed longer-term private rented accommodation.

On the 1st of August, we also reported on the action taken by some London boroughs to curb the temptation for tenants to make money from Airbnb by illegally subletting their rented accommodation.